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Vol. XXII
No. 5
Cover
September/October
2006

In This Issue

SPECIALFEATURES
REGULARCOLUMNS
ANDTHEREST
A Contrario Sensu
On the Other Hand
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- disclaimer -
Send Us Your Story

We are looking for humorous, warm anecdotes and true stories illustrating that homeschooling is the best educational alternative around.

All material printed in the Court Report will be credited, and the contributor will receive a $10 coupon good toward any HSLDA publication of his choice. Submissions may be edited for space. Please be aware that we cannot return photographs.

Mail submissions to:

Attn: Stories, HSLDA
P.O. Box 3000
Purcellville, VA 20134

Or email us (include "Stories" in the subject line) at: ComDept@hslda.org



HOMESCHOOLED INGENUITY AT WORK

Jacob Hurst, son of HSLDA Membership Director Chuck Hurst, was working part-time in our Membership Department this summer when one monotonous task sparked his creativity. Tired of peeling labels off a roll, he went home one evening to devise a “label launcher.” After four hours of Lego construction and 15 minutes of computer programming, the 16-year-old homeschooler had built a device that dispensed labels in two modes-one at a time (controlled by a foot pedal), and continuously (called auto-renew—er, we mean auto-run).

“I saw a need, and I met it,"” commented the young inventor.

WHERE’D SHE FIND THOSE SOCIAL SKILLS?

Last year, my daughter Amanda (then 15), went to a five-day state 4-H conference that was attended by some 300 kids. During lunch one day, she saw a lecturer sitting all alone and asked if the woman would mind if she joined her.

At one point during their lunchtime conversation, the woman asked, “Are you homeschooled?”

“Yes. Why?” returned Amanda.

“Only a homeschooler would ask to sit with an adult and then carry on a conversation,” the woman replied. “Homeschoolers talk to people of all ages—not just their peers.”

And people ask us about socialization!

—Gary & Terri P.
Plant City, FL

LOOKING FOR THE NEGATIVE

My son proved that he had comprehended his science lesson when he said, “This atom is missing an electron.”

“Are you sure?” I asked. “How do you know?”

“It told me!”

“It told you?”

“Yes. It said it was missing an electron, and when I asked it if it was sure, it said yes, it’s POSITIVE!”

—Robin S.
West Jordan, UT

FANCY NAME FOR AN OLD GAME

While home with a babysitter one afternoon, my two youngest children, Trevor (5) and Lauren (4), pulled a game out of the closet. Trevor accidentally dropped the game on the floor, scattering pieces everywhere. The sitter offered to clean up half if he cleaned up the other half.

Trevor turned to his sister and said, “Lauren, you clean up 25% and I’ll clean up 25%.”

To which the sitter responded, “So, you’re learning percentages.”

Trevor replied emphatically, “That’s not percentages—that’s just math!”

—Ruaun M.
Wiesbaden, Germany

VOTED #1 FOR UNDERSTANDABILITY

One day in the car, my then-5-year-old noticed that many of the signs along our southern California roads were in Spanish as well as English.

“Mommy, what language do you think is most prevalent [yes, she used that word] in the world?” asked Kendalyn.

I responded as most homeschool mothers would, with “Well, what do you think, honey?”

Kendalyn was quite pensive for a moment before deciding that her answer was “English.”

“Why do you think that?” I asked her.

“Because it’s the easiest to understand,” she replied matter-of-factly.

—Pamela P.
Murrieta, CA

"WOW! WE’LL HAVE A LOT TO DRINK!"

Everything is exciting to learn at the ages of 8, 6, 4, and 3, especially when you are homeschooled. When a major rainfall hit Massachusetts last May, these kids took out their trusty weather tracker to learn how to measure rain—and were thrilled when they came up with seven inches of it!

—Jen L.
Hubbardston, MA

DEFINITELY NOT PROSE

Our 9-year-old daughter, Naomi (who has Down Syndrome), blessed us with this flash of insight after church one Sunday. Naomi’s father, older sister Sarah, and I were trying to help her understand what “history” means by referencing events according to the day of her birth. We named several different events that she had heard us talk about and explained that since they had happened before she was born, they were part of history.

Then Sarah quizzed, “When Mama and Daddy got married, was that history?”

“No,” Naomi replied, “that was poetry.”

Couldn't have expressed it better myself!

—Carol K.
Columbia, SC

THE PRINCIPAL KNOWS BEST

What are those kids learning when Dad is substitute teaching? One day, I overheard my husband giving our daughter her spelling test. “Scurrilous,” he intoned. “A squirrel without legs is scurrilous.”

—Eileen H.
Cohasset, MN