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Nov 26, 2013

Music, Movement and Learning!

Krisa Winn

We love to sing and dance and move at our house. My kids are such tactile, kinesthetic (wiggly) learners! I continue to learn that rather than fight against this natural bent in their learning preferences to incorporate music and movement into my teaching times, be it acting out Bible stories or putting motions to poems, to singing directions during important routines and transition times. 

Did you know that linking music and movement to learning helps to increase a student’s engagement, retention, and long-term memory of information? More parts of the brain are used, when producing music, than in any other activity. Additionally, music is the perfect delivery system for information because it engages all learning styles equally and at once! Sung language is processed in more parts of the brain then just spoken language, making material “stick” faster. You do not forget what you sing! Singing academic information makes learning fun, fast, and easy!

Particularly for students with learning disabilities, processing glitches and attention and focus difficulties music and movement are powerful tools to wield when teaching. Music and singing turns the brain on. Moving and singing while learning makes the brain to perform “integrate thought” (gets more areas of the brain talking/connecting to one another creating and strengthening those synapses/neural pathways). For students with slow or weak processing areas, singing and moving activates the dormant or slower areas. Singing may actually be easier for students with stuttering and other verbal and expressive/language difficulties and music/singing activities can also be helpful to utilize with students with fluency and prosody problems in reading. So get singing and moving during your day—it will help turn your kids on to learning and emotionally, it can help with stress and anxiety! 

Virginia Largent, creator of Acadamiacs, educational specialist, and workshop presenter who spoke on "Music, Learning and the Brain" at the HEAV convention will be offering several related workshops in Virginia! 

Virginia will be presenting Connections: The Brain Development Seminar in Norfolk on Feb 21 & 22. Visit this website for more information.    

Parents attending the seminar will learn all about their child's brain development. Skipped or shortened movement phases in babyhood results in incomplete brain development. This manifests in children as ADD/ADHD, autism, academic delays, sensory processing disorders etc. or organizing the brain through movement to improve and eliminate ADD/ADHD and a myriad of other learning delays and challenges.

Connections will show parents easy movements/floor exercises to do with their child. Organizing the brain through movement can help to improve and eliminate ADD/ADHD and a myriad of other learning delays and challenges. Doing these movements will actually change their brain and a transformation will begin. Connections may be a source of the help, hope and answers you have been praying for!

Workshops will also be presented at Calvary Chapel, Fredricksburg, VA on Friday, January 31 from 7-9 pm and Saturday, February 1 from 9 am - 3 pm.

Again, the Well Connected Brain website is a great place to find out more information about this upcoming event. 

Some great teaching resources that integrate music and movement are:

  • Carol Barnier’s “Ditty Bugs” cd, available here ; these are rhythmical chants and simple ‘dittys” to teach information. Her book The Big What Now Book of Learning Styles is fabulous and packed full of easy to use activities and teaching ideas to bring in music, movement, and multi-sensory into your teaching day!
  • Acadamiacs, offers over 2000 songs and videos with interactive lyrics, movement, and educational information to make learning fun and easy.
  • Lyrical Learning, puts scientific information to traditional tunes and songs in order to assist students in learning science concepts and facts.

Many Blessings On You and Yours,

Faith

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