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Apr 29, 2013

Don't Jump Ship! Don't Quit Homeschooling

MaryAnn Gaver

"Okay, I've had better days," I thought to myself. I tried to be positive, but felt that I wanted to quit. Teaching. Mothering.  Managing a household. I wanted to jump ship...

I called Jay at the lab to inform him that I was resigning from my teaching position. He said, "Mare—just hang in there for the afternoon, and we'll talk all about it when I get home. We'll take a walk or something. Does that sound good? I love you." 

"I love you, too. And, yes, a walk sounds wonderful."

Well, I got through the afternoon. Later, the two of us strolled around the block as I told him about the grueling phone call with the insurance company, the washing machine breaking, and my struggles in teaching math. Typically, I tried to avoid unloading on him about my day, but I was disheartened, and needed to share what was happening. 

On top of everything else that day, the little volcano we made for science completely flopped, and I had to call the curriculum rep to help me understand the math book!  

Here's the point: Some days are difficult, and some days are better than others. That's mothering—and that's homeschooling. Expect those rough days.

Spring time is an especially hard time to teach. You're almost done (assuming that you take a summer break—which I highly recommend!) for the year. Back yard swings beckon, gardens ache for attention, and little ones fidget as they look out the window to gorgeous spring days....

And I realize that sometimes it's more than spring fever—sometimes it's about our common enemies of exhaustion, fear or doubt.

I always seemed ready to end school in April. I usually planned to teach from (around) Labor Day to Memorial Day—but started losing steam in the spring time. We trudged on until the end of May—but it was hard. 

I think that the best thing to do is to make some adjustments in the family's schedule when you feel less- than- enthusiastic about teaching.  Add a field trip, end a little early on nice days, and work longer on the rainy days. See what works for your family and your own well-being, and do it. For us, getting outside for a little while—whether it was visiting the park or taking in some fresh air in the back yard always seemed to help. 

More than anything, remember—when God calls us to homeschooling—He will see us through. He will enable us to do that which He's called us to do—teach. So, take heart.

Ask your husband to pray for you. Share your needs. Most of all, cry out to God and ask for His help, His strength.

The Lord Jesus Christ is our anchor—the one we hold onto for security, support, and stability! He will help us on the tough days.

Keep going!  Keep teaching! You won't regret it. Yes, there will be difficult days—but the excellent days and benefits will far out- weigh the tough days.

I'm so glad that I didn't resign after all...  

     love,

     MaryAnn

"Any man can work when every stroke of his hands brings down the fruit rattling from the tree... but to labor in season and out of season, under every discouragement ... that requires a heroism which is transcendent." -Henry Ward Beecher

"And let us not be weary in well doing; for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not."  -Galatians 6:9

PC: Charity Klicka

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